BYGONE DAYS OF YORE: 1951: Minister warns crowd of ‘loose talk about partition’

About 2,500 Orangemen, members of North Antrlm lodges, travelled from the Bushmills, Ballymoney, Cloughmllls and Rasharkin districts to a demonstration in Ballycastle, arranged by the local district lodge for the Twelfth celebrations in July 1951.

Many thanks to reader Derek Frazer for sending in these fantastic old photos from a Twelfth that was held at Carnlough in 1963. Mr Frazer writes: These were some of my first efforts at taking photographs, developing and printing them at home in rather primitive conditions. I think we can all agree that they captured the atmosphere of the Twelfth that year. Share your bygone Twelfth photographs, email them to darryl.armitage@jpimedia.co.uk
Many thanks to reader Derek Frazer for sending in these fantastic old photos from a Twelfth that was held at Carnlough in 1963. Mr Frazer writes: These were some of my first efforts at taking photographs, developing and printing them at home in rather primitive conditions. I think we can all agree that they captured the atmosphere of the Twelfth that year. Share your bygone Twelfth photographs, email them to [email protected]

By the time most of the lodges in the procession had reached the field rain, which had been falling earlier, had become heavier, and it was decided to curtail the programme speeches.

Mr W V McCleery, Minister of Commerce, was the main speaker. Proposing the adoption of the resolutions, he said that a new government had recently taken up office in Eire, and “our Prime Minister, Sir Basil Brooke, has lost no time in once again extending the hand of good fellowship to our neighbours across the border”.

Mr McClerry added that as one of the ministers of the government specially interested “in that connection”, that he wholeheartedly endorsed the Northern Ireland Prime Minister. He said that he sincerely hoped that a close and friendly co-operation “might be carried out between the two governments and that it might be found of great benefit to all concerned”.

Many thanks to reader Derek Frazer for sending in these fantastic old photos from a Twelfth that was held at Carnlough in 1963. Mr Frazer writes: These were some of my first efforts at taking photographs, developing and printing them at home in rather primitive conditions. I think we can all agree that they captured the atmosphere of the Twelfth that year. Share your bygone Twelfth photographs, email them to [email protected]

He said: “Unfortunately, we still hear a lot of loose talk from certain quarters about partition, but surely the time has come when that question should be removed from the realm of political conjecture.

“If there is ever to be a family reunion between north and south it can only be brought about by an approach from an entirely different angle, and the sooner those interlopers who are so eager to don the mantle of family practitioner become aware of the fact the better. It would be for the health of the whole family circle.”

Mr McCleery said that they in Ulster were proud of their place within the British Commonwealth “and that position we are determined to uphold”.

Mr G H Scarlett (Ballycastle) presided, and other speakers included Messrs W R Knox (Portrush), J Torrens (Bushmills), and the Reverend T H Willis, DCGC.

Many thanks to reader Derek Frazer for sending in these fantastic old photos from a Twelfth that was held at Carnlough in 1963. Mr Frazer writes: These were some of my first efforts at taking photographs, developing and printing them at home in rather primitive conditions. I think we can all agree that they captured the atmosphere of the Twelfth that year. Share your bygone Twelfth photographs, email them to [email protected]

‘THE OLD ULSTER SPIRIT CAN NEVER BE QUENCHED’

The Orangemen of County Fermanagh, joined by many hundreds of their brethren from Eire, assembled at Enniskillen, where county demonstration held in 1951. Thousands of people lined the route from the Fair Green to the field in Rossory Church Road where the meeting took place.

The County Grand Master (the Earl Enniskillen), who presided, welcomed the brethren, especially those who were present from across the border, and read the following message from Sir Basil Brooke, who was in Norway. It read: “Absence from home prevents my participation In the Twelfth celebrations Enniskillen, but I want all loyalists to know that my thoughts and good wishes ire with them.

“On this stirring anniversary we draw new inspiration from past successes, achieved through much struggle and sacrifice. Constant vigilance, ardent service and firm adherence to principle are still the conditions on which can preserve our British citizenship and keep Northern Ireland within the United Kingdom and the British Commonwealth.

Many thanks to reader Derek Frazer for sending in these fantastic old photos from a Twelfth that was held at Carnlough in 1963. Mr Frazer writes: These were some of my first efforts at taking photographs, developing and printing them at home in rather primitive conditions. I think we can all agree that they captured the atmosphere of the Twelfth that year. Share your bygone Twelfth photographs, email them to [email protected]

“The old Ulster spirit can never be quenched. It burns with an inextinguishable flame. Let the young men and women of today light their torch at that flame, bear it aloft, and in due time hand it on to the generation following.’’

Mr T L Teevan, MP, proposed the first two resolutions, which, he said, could be stated shortly in the phrase – “Ulster is British: our freedom shall maintain.”

He added: “We tend to emphasise those strong and well-tried links which bind us to the British Throne and Empire; our love of liberty and justice; our belief in toleration and truth; our firm resolve that never shall we in Ulster be driven out of that great Empire which has always stood for what we believe to be the honourable, the decent, and the true way of life.

“These beliefs constitute the basis upon which the Orange Order was founded; but in the world of today we are menaced on all sides. Over the entire surface of the earth men seemed to have gone mad; mad with greed for wealth, for power, and for empire. The evil forces of dictatorship and war are spreading slowly and inevitably in the Far East, in the Middle East, and in Europe, and there was only one true way in which we can defeat the creed of godlessness and Communism, and that is to follow the banner of true Christian democracy. The Orange Order was founded on the Christian way of life. There must be eternal vigilance if we are to maintain the freedom which our ancestors won for us at Derry, Aughrim, Enniskillen, and the Boyne.”

Many thanks to reader Derek Frazer for sending in these fantastic old photos from a Twelfth that was held at Carnlough in 1963. Mr Frazer writes: These were some of my first efforts at taking photographs, developing and printing them at home in rather primitive conditions. I think we can all agree that they captured the atmosphere of the Twelfth that year. Share your bygone Twelfth photographs, email them to [email protected]

Mr Teevan concluded by saying that he was sure that “every loyal Ulsterman” was steadfast as their ancestors, but he said that that was not enough. “If we are to succeed in our endeavours to keep Ulster free, we must band together, and it is the duty, therefore, of all loyal people to join the Orange Order.”

‘MAKING ULSTER’S CAUSE BETTER KNOWN’

An organisation to make Ulster’s cause more widely known and understood throughout the United States and Canada was referred to by Colonel S G Haughton, DL, when he addressed the Twelfth demonstration at Ballinderry, Co Antrim.

He described it as development of the suggestion he had made at Ballinderry three years previously that they should open a “Second Front” and make certain that “right-minded people all over the Commonwealth, and indeed the world, were given a fair chance to realise that the only allegation against Ulster was its refusal to leave the Empire”.

Colonel Haughton continued: “We have innumerable friends in the United States and Canada, not only men and women with family roots in Ulster, but many others who have come to recognise the reasonableness of our cause. We must keep in touch with all those people. As many as can, representing as many different Ulster interests, must visit our friends across the Atlantic. They will have an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between our friends abroad and ourselves.”

Colonel Haughton said that the sacrifice of Ulster’s devotion to the Crown and the Empire was demanded as the price for the participation of southern Ireland in the defence of Western Europe.

Many thanks to reader Derek Frazer for sending in these fantastic old photos from a Twelfth that was held at Carnlough in 1963. Mr Frazer writes: These were some of my first efforts at taking photographs, developing and printing them at home in rather primitive conditions. I think we can all agree that they captured the atmosphere of the Twelfth that year. Share your bygone Twelfth photographs, email them to [email protected]

He said: “In vain our political enemies try to fan the sacrificial fire. Our constitutional position in the north is not founded upon whim or upon bigoted notion. It is based upon the 1920 Act, to which the then government in the south put its signature.”

He went on to wonder: “Why was it that our political opponents studiously refrained from ever, on any occasion, mentioning the constitutional position Ulster had a right to retain?” He added: “We seek the friendship of neighbours, and the chance to offer friendship in return. We challenge none. All we ask is freedom to work out our destiny in our own way.”

Mr W J Morgan, MP for Oldpark, said that in Northern Ireland that they must “guard against those of Communistic outlook obtaining executive positions” in the trade union movement.

He said: “Such leadership might readily lead to the breaking down of the organisation, the method of collective bargaining and the agreed machinery for the settlement industrial disputes.

“Ulster’s productivity is one of which we can be justly proud, and we can congratulate ourselves on our comparative freedom from strikes and industrial disputes. I would urge our people, when such occasions arise, to see that the proper channels of negotiation agreed between the government and employees’ representatives are used to their fullest extent.”

The demonstration was held under the auspices of Ballinderry District LOL No 3, and the visiting districts were Lisburn, Hillsborough, Derriaghy, Magheragall, Glenavy and Aghalee.

Mounthill True Blue Pipe Band pictured in Ballyclare in 1958. Picture courtesy of Brian McCammon
Garvetagh Pipe Band pictured at the Black Saturday in Cookstown in 1997. Picture courtesy of James Emery
The Reverend David Reid ,Grand Chaplin of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland, Grand Master Edward Stevenson, Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland and Stanley McFarland, Deputy Grand Treasurer, at the Twelfth parade held at Castlederg in 2018. Picture: Brian Little/ News Letter archives
The Twelfth Parade makes it progress along Springwell Street, Ballymena, in 1962. Picture courtesy of Helen Bingham
Many thanks to Helen Bingham for these old Twelfth photos which were taken by her father in 1962 at Springwell Street, Ballymena
Lambeg drums being beaten during the Twelfth Parade along Springwell Street, Ballymena, in 1962. Picture: Helen Bingham
Larne 12th July,1989 members of Staffordstown District LOL 15, up front left to right, John Bates and Jimmy McKee and in the background an amused Tommy McMullan. Picture courtesy of Liz Kirkpatrick
Members of Warrenpoint LOL 210 Glasgow, July 2018 George Square, left to right Bros Eddie Kerr, Garfield McCoy, Ivan Toombs, Nigel Warburton, Paul Toombs, Desmond Kerr and front row Brother Ernest McGuffin. Picture courtesy of Paul Toombs