Dogs Trust advice to prevent potential pet separation anxiety

Dogs Trust is issuing advice to dog owners following concerns over a ticking time bomb of separation anxiety among dogs post lockdown when families return to their normal routine.

Food search puzzles are a great way to keep your dog occupied when they are having time alone (pic courtesy of Dogs Trust

Dogs Trust is advising...

If your dog is used to being left alone, then try to make sure you continue to leave them for periods during the day, so they don’t ‘lose’ the ability to cope.

For puppies and dogs that are anxious when left, use the following tips to help them cope alone:

Make sure your dog has a comfy bed or den, where they can relax in peace.

Give them something fun to occupy them, such as a long-lasting treat or puzzle toy.

While your dog is enjoying their treat, take a couple of steps to the other side of the room. If your dog stays where they are, wait a moment, then go back and reward them with an extra treat.

Increase the distance you move away and the time you wait before returning with the extra treat. You should soon be able to leave the room and close the door or gate. Progress to spending more time in a different room. Build this into the daily routine.

It’s important that your dog remains relaxed. If they show signs of distress, leave them for a shorter period, or don’t move as far away, next time.

Rachel Casey, Director of Canine Behaviour and Research at Dogs Trust, said: “For many of us it has been great to spend so much time with our dogs during lockdown and mostly our dogs love us being around too. But all this extra attention could potentially create a ticking time bomb of separation anxiety for our dogs. If they expect us to be about all the time, it will be more difficult for them to cope once we go back to our normal lives and aren’t in the house 24/7.

“Now is the time to act to avoid future problems – and it’s easy to do. Just make sure that you factor in time apart from your dog each day to help them be able to cope when alone – this could be separated from you by a door or child gate for an hour or two whilst you’re working or home schooling the kids. By organizing your dog’s day, with time apart, play times, exercise, other activity sessions (like giving them a food filled toy) and quiet times, you can make sure that your dog maintains their ability to cope with the different aspects of ‘normal’ life when we get back to it.”

For more ideas on how to keep your dog occupied visit www.dogstrust.org.uk

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