Roadsafe Roadshow rolls into Ballymena

The Police Service of Northern Ireland’s hard-hitting Roadsafe Roadshow came to students from the Ballymena area in an effort to get young drivers to take more care and responsibility on the roads.

Students from Cambridge House, pictured along with representatives from the PSNI, Fire Service, Ambulance Service, Cool FM and AXA insurance at a road safety event held in Cambridge House. INBT38-201AC

Supported by AXA Insurance, the award winning ‘It Could be You’ Roadshow, was seen by over 800 students during the event at Cambridge House on Thursday.

The road show was attended by students from a host of local schools including Cambridge House, Ballymena Academy, St Louis Grammar, Cullybackey High, Dunclug College, St Patrick’s College and Slemish College.

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Recognising that many people under 25 years of age are killed or injured on our roads, the Roadshow aimed to positively influence those drivers who are about to start out on what will hopefully be a long and safe motoring career.

Students from Cambridge House, pictured along with representatives from the PSNI, Fire Service, Ambulance Service, Cool FM and AXA insurance at a road safety event held in Cambridge House. INBT38-201AC

Principal of Cambridge House, Mrs Lutton said: “It is extremely important for young people to have this kind of clear message coming through. The practicality of not only watching it inside in the hall but coming out and seeing the outcome of what that kind of driving- and not being cautious in the appropriate ways- can have.”

Mrs Lutton also suggested that the roadshow become available to pupils further down the school to ensure the message is driven home at a younger age.

Road Education Officer, Constable Sydney Henry, believes the key to reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on the roads among the youth population lies in education.

“We are extremely pleased that schools from across the area are firmly on board with the road show concept. It is only through educating our young people about the dangers that motorists can face on the roads that we can make a difference.”

The Roadshow, which so far, as been seen by over 45,000 teenagers across Northern Ireland, graphically depicts how a night out can end in tragedy and permanent disability.

The story is told by a police officer, a paramedic, a fire officer, an Accident and Emergency consultant and the real life story of a young woman, who was paralysed following a horrific collision. The narrative is interspersed with music, video clips and television and cinema advertisements.

Constable Henry added: “I have no doubt that those who attend the Roadshow are shocked, perhaps even horrified, by what they see. We make no apology for that.

“We believe that showing realistically what happens on our roads has a strong impact on the students who attend. I hope that after seeing the Roadshow they realise that they are not indestructible; that they are more vulnerable on the roads and that they must respect the roads and other users.”